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1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 133 (111)

1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition
1945 Theatre Catalog
1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 133
Page 133


1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 133

color scheme should be such that it does not impact too forcefully upon the eyes of the patrons. This again calls for treatment in green shades to ease the transitional visual period. The traditional blue or blue-green ceilings of theatres are very effective in this respect. Dashes of colors can be introduced in special decorations around the stage or on narrow wall trims.

Correct color placement, according to the principles of color dynamics, can be used to change the apparent proportions of a theatre lobby, foyer, mezzanine or other areas. Long narrow lobbies, often found in theatres in larger cities, may be made to seem wider by use of darker colors on the end wall to make them advance and light colors on the long side walls to make them retreat. In square foyers, the impression of monotonous proportions can be dissipated by painting one wall, preferably the one opposite the entrance from the auditorium, in a color value different from the end walls. High ceilings, such as found in the older theatres in smaller communities, can be made to seem lower by painting them darker than the walls. Dividing the wall area by use of a dado will appear to reduce the height of a lobby or foyer. The low ceiling of a mezzanine can be made to appear higher with use of a shade such as cascade blue, which tends to make it recede in the distance. Use of light colors tends to increase the apparent size of an area and darker colors are often useful in making a large area seem more compact and efficient.

COLOR AND ILLUMINATION

All colors are affected by light and certain ones materially assist in illumi

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ALTHOUGH NO SPECIFIC DIRECTION can be given for treating a theatre, this chart, showing the physical

characteristics of the primary colors, can serve as a guide for choosing proper color combinations to attract

desired results. As can be noted in the chart, each color, in addition to its physical characteristics, possesses

certain attributes which impel psychological reactions in people. These characteristics and properties have been discovered after extensive reseach and study.

nation by possessing more reflective or diffusing powers than others. Generally, light from incandescent bulbs does not seriously interfere with color selection, although it tends to reduce the strength and intensity of color. It has a slight yellowing effect from the light itself. While fluorescent lighting is comparatively new, its three types-white, daylight, and soft-whitkare widely used.

THE EFFECT OF COLOR DYNAMICS is appreciated most on machines where close tolerance work is necessary.

On this press, focal ivory has been used to outline the essential parts, while the background is in eye-rest

green. This combination is easy on the worker's eyes, and eliminates a large percentage of the nervous strain where close attention must be devoted to the work.







l945-THEAYRE

CATALOG



The light produced by the daylight units is cool with a fairly blue hue making it bestifor use with blues, blue-green, and blue-violet. If other colors are used with this daylight unit they will be affected in much the same manner as adding a small amount of blue pigment to the colors. Thus, any colors in the orange range would prove unsuitable as blue is the complement of orange and would give them a muddy appearance. The white and soft-white fluorescent units produce a warm light tending more toward the red, with the soft-white producing the warmest hues. This characteristic makes them most adaptable to rooms where warm colorsesuch as ivory, cream, beige, rose, or tam-are used. They should not be used with the green shades, as red is the complement of green and the green would become a dark gray.

) CONCLUSION

Experience in many fields has demonstrated that color can be used as a specific instrument, and that, although color is not a universal cure for all the ills that beset a theatre owner, it will go far in helping make a theatre more attractive. Each theatre, of course, presents its own particular decorating problems, but the foregoing discussion of colors and their basic characteristics can serve as a guide to proper use in decoration. From the very nature of color, there can be a wide latitude of selections of schemes and styles and still use its inherent power and energy. As can be seen in the growing popularity of fullcolor movies, there is a growing appreciation and knowledge of correct color usage on the part of most people. The progressive theatre operators will take full advantage of this trend by employing scientific color schemes in their houses.

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1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 133