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1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 319 (295)

1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition
1945 Theatre Catalog
1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 319
Page 319


1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 319

'Bausch and Lomb states it would be p0ssible to use a vignetting filter to reduce the illumination.

NEW HEAT FILTER

Improved projection of color pictures and cooler working conditions for motion-picture and television actors are made possible by a new heat-absorbing, color-transmitting glass announced by the American Optical Company. The new glass, when used as a heat screen in a projector, permits the projection of motion and still pictures in their original colors, thus permitting pictures to be reproduced on the screen just as they were taken.

The glass absorbs heat emitted by the light source, so that films and Slides are protected against burning. This insulating property enables film editors and educators to study a specific projected scene by stopping the projector and relying on the glass to protect the film. The glass can also be used in Spotlights and Hoodlights as a heat screen to protect motion-picture and 1; e 1 e v i s i o n actors against burning. This insulating property enables film editors and educators to study a specific projected scene by stopping the projector and relying on the glass to protect the film. The glass can also be used in spotlights and floodlights as a heat screen to protect motionpicture and television actors against the scorching heat generated by the powerful lights. Approximately 90 per cent of the present almost unendurable heat is absorbed by the glass. Development of the glass makes possible improved, safe, color projection on an extended scale in homes, schools, theatres, and stores.

"The new glass? Dr. Edgar D. Tillyer, American Opticalis research director, explained, uabsorbs approximately 90 per cent of the infra-red (heat) radiations and transmits approximately 85 per cent of the light out of a possible 92 per cent (8 per cent is generally lost by reflections) If reflections are reduced by glare-removing methods, light transmission can be increased from 85 to 90 per cent. The glass transmits colors accurately, is chemically stable, resists weathering Without requiring a surfacing treatment, and can be molded, ground, polished and fabricated like ordinary glass. It is formed from carefully balanced proportions of phosphorus, aluminum and silicon oxides, supplemented by various conditioning ingredients, together with ferrous iron as the heat-absorbing agent}y

The story behind the new glass, as revealed by Doctor Tillyer, is another example of American scientific ingenuity triumphing over reputed German superiority in glass development. Prior to the war, heat screens for color picture projectors were generally imported from Germany. Although relatively efficient light transmitters, they were chemically unstable and had to be given a special surfacing treatment by their manufacturers to make them resist weathering. Furthermore, they could not be worked like conventional glass. At the outbreak of the war, it became impossible to continue importations of the glass. In View of its importance, technologists intensified their development of new heat

1945-THEATRE CATALOG

































DR. E. D. TltLYER, American Optical's research director, demonstrates how the new heat-absorbing, color-transmitting glass protects a film or slide against heat emitted by the light of a proiector. Despite a protective shield of ordinary glass placed before it, the film in the right pedestal bursts into fiames while the film in the left pedestal, protected by a piece of the newly developed heatabsorbing glass, survives without damage.

screens and finally perfected this composition that is superior to the German glass.

REFLECTORS AND MIRRORS Basically, a mirror consists of a piece

of clear glass on which a layer of metallic silver has been deposited. The silver refiecting surface is actually on the back side of the glass as one looks into it and is covered with a protective backing to preserve the finish.

IN ADDITION TO IMPROVING the proiection of color pictures, the new glass can also be used as a heat screen in spotlights and Headlights to protect movie and television actors from scorching heat generated by the powerful lights, This picture demonstrates how the glass absorbs heat emitted by the fioodlight (upper right). A thermometer placed between the glass and the source of heat registers a temperature of 220 degrees, whereas the other thermometer, behind the heat-absorbing glass, registers only a relatively chilly 80 degrees Fahrenheit.







































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1945 Theatre Catalog, 4th Edition, Page 319