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1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 147 (135)

1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition
1947-48 Theatre Catalog
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 147
Page 147


1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 147

SHADOW BOX See Figs H 2 w

FIGURE BeSkeich showing arrangement of standee posts and ropes in the lobby. The lobby is also used during periods of rush business ior hold-outs and, therefore, must be planned for such use. The equipment for this area should include hold-out posts or rails to: controlling crowds

rior frames for a theatre of the size and type being discussed would be four frames for 40- by 60-inch posters, and two frames for stills. Combination corner frames with the 40- by 60-inch on the street front and the still frames on the returns can usually be worked out, with a 40- by 60-inch in each side wall of the vestibule. The arrangement of these depends entirely on the width of the front, location of the box office, and the depth of the vestibule. (See Figures 4 and 5.)

Frames for 40- by 60-inch poster require a clear glass size of 3!) inches by 59 inches, the over-all size depending on the material of which they are constructed. Outside frames should all be glazed and the doors should be attached to the frames with full length piano hinges and equipped with two locks, one near the top and one near the bottom of the door to prevent warping. The back of the frame should be soft plywood and should have rabbeted members at top and bottom, and sprng clips on the sides to hold the posters (Figure (i).

if the exterior display frames are directly under the marquee and if the marquee is lighted as it should be, no other lighting will be required. if this is not the case, provision must be made in the

1947-48 THEATRE CATALOG

THESE ROPES ARE OPERATED BY THE USHER T0 CONTROL STANDEES

THESE SHORT ROPES PROVIDE BETrER CONTROL WHEN FRONT ROPEQ ARE OPERATED

RE MOVAB LE STANDEE POSTS

40"x 60" POSTER FRAMES

PHOTO FRH MES

PLUSH COVERED ROPES OR TAP59



construction of the frames for concealed lighting for which the new slim-line fluorescent tubing is particularly adaptable. In case the frames are individually lighted they will require more depth from the glass back to the poster to properly conceal the light source.

Provision should be made in the masonry or other construction to recess all display frames, flush with the finish of the surrounding material.

THE MAIN LOBBY

The lobby and perhaps and adjoining foyer are the spaces which connect the exterior vestibule with the auditorium proper and are, therefore, the first places entered by the patrons and consequently the most impressive. These areas are also the most brilliantly lighted and therefore lend themselves to colorful and interesting decor. They are also the spaces which are subjected to the most wear and tear by the public. (See Figure 7.)

The designer should keep these facts in mind and choose his material and decorating,r scheme accordingly.

Most designers lose sight of the fact that the seating areas of the thcati'c are normally viewed by the patrons under very subdued lighting, and as a

in orderly fashion, and to keep the exit passages clear for patrons who are constantly leaving the theatre. It is the practice lo divide the lobby down the center with a row of removable posts, connected by velourcovered ropes. Ropes are also used to separate portions of the standees.

matter of fact in a continuous policy house, the only patrons who see the auditorium under fully lighted conditions are those who are seated before the start of the opening show and the corresponding few who stay until the end of the last reel. It is, therefore, good business to spend money for highly decorative effects in the lobby and foyer rather than in the auditorium proper.

This is not to be construed as recommending no decoration in the auditorium but does recommend restraint in the use of unnecessary lighting equipment and decorative effects which cannot be appreciated under reducod lighting. The decorative treatment of the auditorium will be discussed in a subsequent section.

The lobby is also used during periods of rush business for holdeouts and therefore must be planned for such use. Equipment for this area should include hold-out posts and ropes or rails for controlling crowds in orderly fashion, and to keep the exit passages clear for the patrons who are constantly leaving. (See Figure 8.)

It is good practice to divide the lobby down the center with a row of removable posts, connected by velour covered ropes, metal rails or a combination of both. The posts are supported in the
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 147