Drive-Ins.com
> > > >

1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 150 (138)

1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition
1947-48 Theatre Catalog
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 150
Page 150


1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 150

STRAP ANCH

7 METAL MOULDING '\

t s \\

M ETAL STANDEE P0

94/ WIRE LATH and VLASTE with LINOLEUMor PLYWOOD



BRASSor ALUMINUM

METAL SOCKET with FLANGE FLUSH WITH CARPET.

FIGURE ll-The standee rail, that serves the primary purpose of a bare rier dividing the seating ctreq from the standee foyer, can be designed to: concealed lighting on the foyer side and also, on the auditorium side, for the returnsuir grilles for the ventilating and air-conditioning A plate glass screen is, or can be,

to 14 inches in width. Since this top is subjected to extremely hard wear, a finish of paint or varnish will not stand up, and in many instances has been covered with the same leatherette or material used for the seat covering, over 3. padding of Ozite or with a piece of plain colored carpet. If an angle iron frame as described above is used, the vertical surfaces can either be plywood or cement plaster on metal lath. The standee rail can, of course, be constructed of solid masonry with both faces vertical or can be framed in wood. In any case the construction and anchoring should produce a substantial rail which will resist the wear and strains of constant tratiic,

Whether or not a screen of some kind should be placed on top of the standee rail will be determined by the layout of this portion of the theatre. The screen serves several purposes, such as preventing annoyance by standees to patrons in the back row of seats, elimination of noise from the standee foyer area, the prevention of drafts, and the screening of daylight and lobby lighting from the screen when the doors are open.

In most every case, a glass screen on top of the standee rail to the height of at least 6 feet will be found effective in lessening the annoyance to the seated patrons, still allowing the standees to see and hear the picture. It will be found that if standees do not annoy the other patrons too much, the fact that they can absorb part of the picture while waiting to be seated, will materially increase the turnover of the house on busy days when seats are at a premium.

If the standee rail is quite close to the front entrance doors and there are only two sets of doors between it and the sidewalk, then a full height screen with doors at the aisles is indicated. The screen in this instance can be solid wood, masonry or plaster on wire lath and furring, or it: can haVe glaSs panels which can be covered on the seating side with quite heavy fabric drapes hung on tracks with drawstrings for easy operation from the aisles. These drapes will be found necessary in most instances to prevent reflection and distortion of the sound in the seating portion.

Whether or not a full height screen

PLATE GLRSS SCREEN

HARDWOOD or METAL sms. 5'-OHO.C.

CARPET WITH PADDI N6 WOOD TOP

CEMENT PLASTER OR PLYWOOD

3"CHANNEL . FRAMES 40 ac.

2."x 2L2le Vial/ANGLE

A RETURN AIRGRlLLE

SI OTS IN CONCRETE SLRB



system. In the latter case, the rail should be supported by angle-iron frames securely fastened or imbedded in the concrete slab. The baseot the rail on the foyer side should have a 4-inch recess for toe space

mounted atop the standee rail.

is used will, of course, influence the decoration and the lighting of this space. If a low screen is selected, the standee foyer actually becomes a part of the auditorium. The lighting level and decorative scheme will be a continuation and will conform more or less with the the scheme of the auditorium proper. A full height screen which entirely separates the standee foyer from the orchestra creates a separate room which can be treated, so far as decoration and lighting are concerned, without necessarily being influenced by the decorative scheme of the auditorium. if the plan can be developed to include niches or open spaces as part of thc standee foyer for furniture groups, either movable or built in, but which will not interfere with the paths of incon'ling or outgoing traffic, the patrons will appreciate the acctmimodations and it will add greatly to the general decor of this area.

Stondee Post's

Whether or not the local police or fire department enforce any regulations as to standees in the theatres, provisions must be made to control them and to

THEATRE CATALOG 1947-48
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 150