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1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 167 (155)

1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition
1947-48 Theatre Catalog
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 167
Page 167


1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 167

Even though it is contemplated to use fuel other than coal, provisions for a coal bin, either present or future, should be incorporated in the plans. This necessity was brought home very vividly 'to many owners during the war when theatres were required to change from oil to coal, or go out of business.

The boiler room should have sufficient fioor area to permit the installation of the boiler and its appurtenances, the hot 'water heater, pumps, and so forth, and still leave room all around the boiler for accessibility for the necessary firing and care such as ash removal, cleaning jiues, and the like.

The wall of the boiler room, immediately in front of the boiler, should be at a distance great enough to permit the easy replacement of the boiler tubes.

The boiler should never bet set in a pit below the floor, but the floor should be level and the ceiling of ample height to clear the boiler, the pipe header above, and so forth.

A door drain should be installed connecting to the sewer, through a sump pump if necessary, to keep the floor dry and to permit "blowing off" the boiler.

If coal is to be used as fuel, provide an ash hoist conveniently located. Provide a fresh air intake from the outside air to provide suiiicient oxygen for combustion, either by means of a duct or grilled window which can be opened. This opening should not be less than 18 inches above the outside grade, especially in localities which are subject to heavy snowfalls.

The entrance to the boiler room should be equipped with a self-closing tin clad Underwritersi-approved door with channel iron frame, and opposite the entrance there should be an emergency exit leading direct to the outside. An iron ladder for access to this emergency

FIGURE ZSeThe catwalks should be hung from the root structure and can be constructed with strap hangers, angle iron ledgers with plank walks. or, it required by the code or Underwriters, the walk can be of concrete on hy-rib metal lath. Provision should he made tor ventilatinq

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1947-48 THEATRE CATALOG

exit is satisfactory.

The boiler flue should be lined with fire brick set in fire clay to a point not less than 20 feet above the level of the breeching. Provide a cast iron thimble in the due for breeching connection, and cleanout door and frame at the bottom.

Mechanical Equipment Room

The size of the mechanical equipment room will be determined by the type of air conditioning, if any, and the ventilating fan, and other items. If air conditioning is to be installed, the equip ment will include supply and exhaust fans, condensing unit, heating and cooling coils with their sheet metal enclosures, perhaps an air washer and evaporative condenser. An air compressor may also be required for the control system, and in some cases a deep well pump when well water is used for condensing purpose, or to take the place of the condensing unit.

It is sometimes expedient to locate part of this equipment such as the fans and coils on the same level, adjacent to the projection booth, with the condensing equipment located directly below. The cooling coils, however, should not be located at too great a distance from the condenser for the most efficient operation.

If this room is located at the basement level, it will also be the best location for the sump and ejector pumps if both or either are required. Floor drains should be conveniently located near the equipment.

A small room adjacent to the equipment room is desirable for the electric service equipment, such as disconnect switches for the power and light service, current transformers, meters, meter loops, and so forth, in accordance with the requirements of the local service company.

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The Attic

If the theatre has a width between side walls greater than 60 feet, the structural design will include trusses for the support of the roof and the suspended ceiling below. This space then becomes available for the ventilating ducts and electrical conduits for the lighting in the auditorium ceiling.

Since the ducts will be equipped with dampers for adjusting the ventilating system, the electrical disconnects, and perhaps winches for the auditorium fixtures, a system of catwalks should be installed to make these various spots available. This will preclude the necessity of Walking on the furring and the resulting possibility of breaking through the finished plaster ceiling. The catwalks should be hung from the roof structure and can be constructed with strap hangers, angle iron ledgers with plank walks, or if required by the code or Underwriters, the walk itself can be of concrete on hy-rib metal lath. (See Figures 28 and 29.)

Provision should be made for ventilating the attic space to remove accumulated heat which will occur in the summertime. Louvres at each end of the attic space, close to the ceiling, with gravity ventilators through the roof will relieve this condition. The louvres should be equipped with shutters to permit airtight closing during the heating season.

The access to the attic space should be as convenient as possible with a tightfitting door or hatchway. If it is necessary to resort to a vertical ladder and hatchway, the hatchway cover should be counterbalanced and platforms provided immediately adjacent.

Lighting should be provided in this space with control switch at the entrance. '

the attic space to remove accumulated heat which will occur in the summertime. Louvers at ectch end of the attic space, close to the ceiling, with gravity ventilators through the roof will relieve this condition. The louvers should be equipped with shutters to permit airtight closing.
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 167