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1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 332 (318)

1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition
1947-48 Theatre Catalog
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 332
Page 332


1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 332

THE SEQUENCE OF FLUSHING ACTION is as follows:

The water normally present in the bowl as a

refill or water seal (top) is thrown over the dam into the down-leg by the action of the flushing supply from the flush valve, and the water piles up in the down leg. The operation is hastened considerably by the action of C: )et (top and center) which stimulates the movement of water over the dam.



AS WATER CONTINUES to pile up (top and center). the added weight of water in the down-leg and

the. lesser weight in the up-leg cause a faster flow through the down-leg and create a syphonic action which empties the bowl and expells the contents. When the water in the down-leg lowers to a certain

point (bottom), the syphon action is broken and ilushinq action ceases.

Modern urinals are similar.

the down-leg. This operation is hastened considerably by the action of a jet which stimulates the movement of water over the dam.

As water continues to pile up, the added weight of water in the down-leg and the lesser weight in the up-leg cause a faster now through the down-leg and create syphonic action which empties the bowl and expells the contents. When the water in the down-leg lowers to, a certain point, the syphon is broken and the flushng action ceases.

Modern urinals, correctly proportioned to assure proper use and higest standards of sanitation, function in much the same way as a water closet. When they are flushed, contents are quickly expelled and the bowl is thoroughly cleansed.

FIXTURES OF VITREOUS CHINA

The finest water closets and urinals are made of genuine vitreous chinaea smooth, hard, permanently non-absorbent material with a surface glaze which provides lasting beauty and makes cleaning easy. Genuine vitreous china is a unique product, combining as it does the art and skill of the potter with the mechanical ingenuity of the Master Plumber.

The materials that go into its manufacture include different types of china clays, ball clays, ground fiint, and ground feldspar. Each item has certain properties, all of which are necessary to produce satisfactorily finished products. For example, flint contributes to the hardness and strength. Feldspar is a fusing and binding ingredient, forming a dense, non-porous and non-absorbent ffbody." Precisely measured quantities of these ingredients are carefully processed, molded, and fired at extremely high temperatures to form smooth, lustrous, nonabsorbent genuine vitreous china plumbing fixtures.

ENAMELED PLUMBING FIXTURES

Todayis neat, efficient lavatories also are made of genuine vitreous chinae and of enameled cast iron. The latter type construction is another triumph of engineering skill, for plumbing fixtures of cast iron enemelware are a combination of two very dissimilar materialse a metal and a glassewhich provides the durability and hardness of glass, and the rigidity and strength of cast iron.

The glassdike coating called ffenamel" consists of many materials, each serving a specific purpose. Some are used to equalize as closely as possible the expansion and contraction of the enamel with that of the iron; some to bring the melting point of the mixture to the proper degree of temperature; some to give the correct amount of opacity and lustre to the ware. Such materials as feldspar, borax, quartz, soda ash, nitrates, and metallic oxides in minuter exact proportions are made into a powder, several coats of which are applied to the hot cast iron of the fixtures and fired until the plumbing fixtures are covered with a thick, lustrous coating of enamel.

A further advancement in the field of enameled cast iron plumbing fixtures is the development of acid-resisting enamel. This material, by a variation of its ingredients, is made to withstand the ma tion of strong acids which may conn THEATRE CATALOG 1947-48
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 332