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1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 560 (544)

1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition
1947-48 Theatre Catalog
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 560
Page 560


1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 560

EVERYBODY HAPPY? The popcorn business is no longer in its infancy, but has established its place with the industries of the world. Although it has been built up in the United States, it is fast becoming an international food. Take time out to learn your business and see that your own

also creates a very unsightly and unsanitary condition. No one likes to eat food from any equipment that appears to be unsanitary; so set up a regular cleaning program and see that your employees follow it religiously.

The personal appearance and personal sanitation habits of the employees handling popcorn are certainly important. Keep the employees in clean uniforms, see that their general appearance is neat and that their personal habits are clean throughout.

In the rush of handling a popcorn business there is a tendency to become careless and negligent in cleaning habits. Oil, kernels of corn, and popped corn many times are scattered about the machine and around the tioor where the operators are handling the materials. This creates a very poor appearance and is not at all necessary. If something is spilled, it certainly should be cleaned up immediately. This all adds to the appearance of your standand to the all important customer impression of your operation. Remember, you must keep them sold on the idea that you are serving a clean, healthful food.

FIRE AND SAFETY PROBLEMS

In previous sections of this article, I have urged you to give thought to the regulations set out by the local fire department and to safety of operation. Since this is an important factor in your setup, I want to call your attention to it in an entirely separate section.

Modern popcorn machines of reliable manufacture, like home gas or electric ranges, are not definite fire hazards or unsafe machines to handle, but common-sense thought must be used by the

operator, for after all they are a mechanical piece of equipment utilizing heat and power.

The operators of the machines must be trained in the use of the equipment. It must be impressed upon them that foolish acts can cause trouble and dainage. The average manufacturer has taken every precaution to guard against such possibilities, but all the time, trouble and money spent by these manufacturers on this phase of the design of the machine is in vain if the operatcrs do not handle the equipment as the manufacturer has instructed.

There are several precautions that should be taken and I will list a feW of these:

Train your help thoroughly and accurately in the operation of the equipment.

See that all electrical wiring is installed under fire code recommendations and that there is no possible chance of wiring failure that might cause a fire.

Instruct your operators thoroughly on what to do in case of a fire, such as turning off or disconnecting the main power supply, the use of fire prevention equipment, instructions on your regular fire prevention policies or procedure in case of a fire.

It is also well to stress safety in operation. Many small accidents can be eliminated by bringing out this point with the operators. See that cans of raw materials are not placed in the working areas, oil spilled on the floor immediately cleaned up so that there is sound footing, and many other little precaue tions that not only add to the safety of the operation but improve the general cleanliness of the stand and the efiiciency of the entire setup.



particular operations meet the high quality and cleanliness standards that a toperunkinq food product deserves. Popcorn is big business. a growing business, a sound business. and a profitable business. Let us all work to keep it that way! And then everybody will, indeed, be truly happy.

OPERATING PERSONNEL

Your operating personnel are your salesmen. In them you vest nearly the entire success of your operation. To put in new personnel without the proper training means a poorer quality product, lowered health, safety and fire standards, and poor salesmanship in presenting your finished product to the public.

When it is necessary to break in a new person, spend some time with him; teach him the entire operation as you know itenot only how to run the ma > chine but how you want your product

merchandised and how you want it presented to your customers. It is unfair to expect a person to do a new job successfully without training, and the operation of a popcorn stand is no exception to this rule. Devote time to this factor of your business and it will pay you off in increased sales and profits.

SUMMARY

Throughout this article I have tried to stress the fact that the popcorn business is no longer in its infancy, but that it has established its place with the industries of the world. Although it has been built up in our United States it is fast becoming an international food.

Those of us that have taken a place in the industry should be proud of this place and should do all we can to make our industry continue to grow.

Take time out to learn your business and see that your own particular operations meet the high quality and cleanliness standards that a top ranking food

> product deserves.

We repeat, popcorn is big business. It is a growing business. It is a sound business. It is a profitable business. Let us all work together to keep it that way!

THEATRE CATALOG 1947-48
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 560