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1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 589 (571)

1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition
1947-48 Theatre Catalog
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 589
Page 589


1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 589

The burning life of this 1,100 lumens trim is one hour, ample for the projection of a 2,000-foot, 16-min. reel at sound speed of 24 frames a second. The trim, currently selling for approximately 25 cents, pulls 1,400 watts from the power line. Ten-hour incandescent lamps that deliver 275 lumens to the screen sell at over 75 cents per hour of life and draw 1,000 watts from the power line. Thus the Pearlex trim can be operated for about one-third the cost of the incandescent lamp while delivering four times as much light.

COLOR QUALITY OF LIGHT

The operating characteristics of the carbon-arc trim for 16-mm. projection are similar in many respects to those of the Suprex carbons Widely used for 35-mm. projection, but with certain modifications of color quality.4 In the snow 4LOZIER, W. W., and D. B. JOY. A carbon are for the projection of 16-mm. film. Jour. Soc. M. P. Eng. 34: 756. 1940.

SUGGESTED SEATING PLANS are presented Ior theatres with capacities of 114 (bottom left), 412 (top left), and 1,016 patrons (right). These drawings (reduced in scale) are based on the recommendations that the patrons be seated not closer to the screen than twice the width oi the screen nor

SEATING PLAN ".3 FOOT For. WREEN ".3 FT. SCREEN;

CAPACITY 4I2 n.

'W



LENS TO SCREEN-60 FT.

SEATING PLAN FOR 5.7 FT. SCREEN;

CAPACITY II4

EN-so FT?! E.\ 0.



LENS TO

1947-48 THEATRE CATALOG

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white color of light typical of the highintensity arc, the spectral energy distribution is characterized by an essentially even balance of energy throughout the different colors of the spectrume which is desirable for the projection of 35-mm. film in color and in black and white.

The 16-mm. color film, which is now most widely used, has been processed for projection with incandescent lamps, however, and these lamps differ from the high-intensity arcs in that their light is relatively very low in energy in the blue and very high in energy in the red. As a result, when 164nm. color film, processed for incandescent lamps, is projected by the snow-white light of the high-intensity arc, the blues are overemphasized and the reds are subdued.

The light from the Pearlex carbons has been adjusted to meet the requirements of such film by subduing the blue light and intensifying the red light. This

has resulted in a color of light which is satisfactory for both 16-min. black-andWhite and color-film projection. Colortemperature of the screen light is approximately 4,450 degrees Kelvin.

Data on screen light given throughout this paper are based upon untreated lenses. Carbon arc projection of 16-mm. film with untreated lenses meets recommended standards of projection practice. Use of treated lenses will, of course, still further increase the amount of light on the screen. This might be utilized either to make a given screen brighter or to adequately illuminate a still larger one.

Carbon-arc projectors are now available from all the larger manufacturers of 16-min. equipment. They make practical the showing of 16-mm. pictures before a comfortably seated audience of several hundred at light levels conforming to the best standards of projection practice.

iarther away than six times the width 01 the screen, and all with a viewing angle of 30 degrees {tom the vertical plane. are based on the use of lS-mm. high-intensity arc lamps for the 11.1% and. 17.9-ioot screens, and an incandescent lamp for the 5.74001 screen.

These plans

SEATING PLAN FOR l7.9 FT. SCREEN;

CAPACITY IOI6

l7.9 FOOT SCREEN

g.u] U M. Q

I Z u] m K

(I) O .m

m .1



36 FEET

l08 FEET
1947-48 Theatre Catalog, 6th Edition, Page 589