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1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 149 (129)

1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition
1950-51 Theatre Catalog
1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 149
Page 149


1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 149

9.

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16.

17. 18. 19.

20.

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25.

26.

0.4% (1.5%) contained five children.

0.1% (0.5%) contained six children.

Considering only the 54% (55%) of the cars containing children, cars with children averaged 1.8 (1.77) children per car.

From the standpoint of time of

performance:

a. For first performances, on weekdays (Monday through Thursday), there were 0.9 (1.2) children in all cars.

b. For second performances, on weekdays, there were .52 (.57) children in every car.

c. For first performances, on weekends (Friday through Sunday), there were 1.2 (1.2) children per car.

d. For second performances, on weekends, there were .80 (.57) children per car.

e. For first performances, on weekdays, 49% of the cars contained children.

f. For second performances, on weekdays, 31% of the cars contained children.

g. For first performances, on weekends, 63% of the cars contained children.

h. For second performances, on weekends, 44% of the cars contained children.

2% (3.3%) of all cars contained

only one adult.

67% (74%) contained two adults.

14% (10%) contained three adults. 14% adults. 2% (1.7%) contained five adults. .60% (50%) contained six adults. From the standpoint of time of performance:

a. For first performance, weekdays, there were 2.46 (2.2) adults per car.

b. For second performance, weekdays, there were 2.65 (2.47) adults. '

c. For first performance, weekends, there were 2.40 (2.27) adults.

d. For second performance, weekends, there were 2.60 (2.47) adults.

19.3% (10.4%) of all adults were

in the 12-20 age group.

45.1% (48.2%) were in the 21-30

age group.

22.3% (26.7%) were in the 31-40

age group.

8.4% (9.7%) were in the 41-50

age group.

3.2% (4.4%) were in the 51-60

age group.

1.7% (0.6%) were in the over 60

age group.

From the standpoint of time of

performance:

lat 2nd lst 2nd Peri. Perf. Peri. Perf. Age Week- Week- Week- WeekGroup days days ends ends 12.20 25.3% 41.0% 11.2% 20.9% 21-30 41.6 34.2 43.4 52.5 31-40 21.6 18.0 2 . 41-50 6.5 ' 51-60 3.9 Over 60 1.1

(10.5%) contained four

me slew

1950-51 THEATRE CATALOG

1WD CHILDREN



FIVE OR MORE CHILDREN

THREE FOUR CHILDREN CHILDREN

FIGURE 3. Analysis of child patronage during 1950 (open graph) as contrasted to 1949 (shaded graph).

Significance

The average total audience per car increased from 3.28 persons in 1949 to 3.45 persons in 1950, an increase of over 5% in per car patronage. This 1950 per car audience, composed of 2.48 adults and .97 children per car, again indicates the strong element of iffamilyii attendance at drive-in theatres. However, averages in this case can be misleading.

The typical drive-in audience is still composed of tw0 distinct groups of patrons: those with and without children. Numerically, the latter group is almost as large as the group with children. The 54% of cars containing children averaged 1.8 children per car, and undoubtedly represent a logical, loyal backbone of patronage for the drive-in theatre, come what may. Many of them represent a part of the potential motion picture audience which the conventional theatre had filost," or could not attract.

Moreover, from the standpoint of sales promotion, there remains a large reservoir of such patrons (with children) among whom sales appeals will continue to be effective. A substantial proportion of these patrons will represent a net addition to the total motion picture audience.

It should be recognized, however, that drive-in theatres are gradually attracting more and more patrons because of advantages which may not be related to the ease of bringing or caring for children. The ease and convenience of attending a drive-in is certainly not an advantage limited only to those with children, the aged, or the handicapped. Both wage earners and white-collar workers, as well as persons in all strata of economic and social life, can appreciate the drive-in theatreis wide variety of convenient services and attractions, and the special sense of informality that is character FIGUBE 4. Analysis of adult patronage during 1950 (open graph) as contrasted to 1949 (shaded graph).



FOUR FIVE OR MORE

ADULYS ADULTS
1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 149