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1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 15 (xv)

1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition
1950-51 Theatre Catalog
1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 15
Page 15


1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 15

' GENUINE FRIENDLINESS, IN THE FORM OF A WARM GREETING FOR EVERY PATRONV IS THE VALUED TRADEMARK OF THIS DOORMAN.

The doorman is not burdened with any great physical or mental demands. His greatest asset, therefore, lies in his public relations value of giving every patron a cheery smile and a friendly greetll

Ushers are a Very important cog in your public relations machine, and greater intelligence should be displayed in their training, Discipline is important, especially in a large theatre, but the common practice of giving them virtual military training along the lines of a rigid set of rules is both inefficient and outmoded. People would rather come into contact with human beings than with a bunch of robots.

School your ushers in the principles of courtv until they become naturally courteou.-teach them to use their intelligence so that th will be able. to react

1950-51 THEATRE CATALOG

to situations which may arise. Both your ushers and your patrons will be far happier.

Some theatre owners and some theatre employeesbprobably b cause they are able to push people around on crowded night ehave come to acquire the bad habit of regarding their patrons with more. or less concealed contempt. Your patrons, after all, give you your living and have the right to be treated as guests who are. p '11:; their way. Some of them are mo important than you are, and can buy and sell you ten times over.

The Theatre Lobby

The sparkle of the theatre front and the friendliness of the theatre personnel should be reflected in the lobby.

As few people see very much of the auditorium \ihen it is illuminated, they form their impression of your theatre from the lobby. Here is where you can display your ingenuity and sense of artistic 'alues.

It is your theatre achitect and interior decorator, of course, who will do the actual work, but you can determine the general motif to be followed. Whatever you do, be consistent. If you vant a theatre of the, gaudy pie-depression era, then make it'just as theatrical as you po bly ii. If you are. following a restrained and conservative. pattern, donlt spoil the whole effect with a few blatant touches.

In spite of the considerable sums sometimes expende on them, theatre lobbies are often cold and uninviting. It

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1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 15