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1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 154 (134)

1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition
1950-51 Theatre Catalog
1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 154
Page 154


1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 154

35.1% in the third, or itcomfortii class. The only significant changes from this pattern occur when second-performance patrons are considered separately, in which case less emphasis was placed on "children" advantages, and more emphasis was placed on ucomfort" advantages. It goes without saying that the benefits of these various advantages should be stressed, wherever appropriate, in general or specialized advertising or promotional campaigns.

Answers to the second question, ttWhat one thing needs improvement the most ?", were not grouped into general classes so that the full range of answers could be presented to all drive-in exhibitors, many of Whom have evidenced great interest in the question. It should be noted, of course, that no claim is made that the method of asking for one most important criticism is the best way to obtain the broadest possible base for a ranking of dislikes. For instance, if under optimum conditions and not accompanied by the many other questions in this survey, one could ask the patron to rank, in the order of importance, a number of dislikes, it would be possible to gain even more accurate data on the subject.

Nevertheless, considerable insight into the matter can be gained by a study of the responses herein presented in the order of their importance, together with the percentage of patrons mentioning each as being his or her most important "gripe."

Significance

Regardless of the fact that some of these responses are due to specific conditions confronted by patrons at the drive-in theatres where the survey was taken, the above list of itconditions needing improvement the most" provides every drive-in exhibitor with a convenient check-list of possible sources of improvement, and indicates to some extent the importance which the public places on each item. Certainly the first ten or fifteen items listed require the continued attention and interest of every conscientious exhibitor, and should be subject to further investigation in order to develop the most practical policies and techniques possible.

CONCLUSION

Drive-in theatres, as a group, are the most dynamic force in the entire



COMPLAINTS MENTIONED BY AT LEAST 1% OF ALL PATRONS

1. 35.2%-either did not answer the

question, could not think of a

complaint, or responded that

everything at drive-in theatres

was to their satisfaction.

22.8%epictures Htoo old."

11.4%-pr0blems of leaving the

theatre too diflicult.

4. 3.2%-too many or too long intermissions.

5. 2.3%etoo difficult to obtain re freshments when desired.

2.2%-poor speakers.

1.8%*poor grading and surfac ing.

8. 1.6%eno music before shows or during intermissions.

9. 1.5%-poor screen (not enough

93m

contrast).

10. 1.3%eno windshield-wiping service.

11. 1.2%-prices of admission too high.

12. 1.1%-other cars too noisy or boisterous (reckless driving, hornhonking, spotlights, frequent entrance and exit of cars, etc.).

13. 1.1%einsects.

14. 1.0%etoo many lights on during showntime.

COMPLAINTS MENTIONED BY LESS THAN 1% OF ALL PATRONS

15. Pictures begin before it is dark enough to see well.

16. Patrons cannot park their cars where they like.

17. Lack of courtesy or helpfulness by car ushers.

18. Poor view of picture from rear or sides of parking area.

19. Too much time wasted at ticket booth when entering.

20. Fog or rain prevents good visibility and enjoyment.

21. Have to wait for car space on busy nights; car capacity not large enough.

22.

23. 24.

25.

26. 27. 28.

29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43.

44.

45.

46.

Too much dust within the theatre area. . Restrooms inadequate or unkept. Not enough shorts, cartoons, etc., shown.

Outdoor theatres located too far away from home.

Drive-ins should sell beer.

Screen too small.

Drive-in theatre season is too short. I

Performances should start earlier in the evening.

Pictures more suitable for children should be shown.

Too many commercial advertisements shown.

There should be more midnight shows.

Too few or poorly located water fountains.

Drive-ins show too many Western pictures.

Hearing-aid attachments should be provided.

Monthly printed programs of attractions should be furnished. Lights from nearby street or highway not shielded.

Stop showing so many previews of coming attractions.

Not enough drive-ins to serve the public. '

Theatre seats should be available down front.

There should be movies.

Drive-ins should have gas station and tire repair services. Newspaper advertisements should show when each show starts. Aisle and speaker identification and layout do not permit easy location of car in the parking area.

Needless imperfections or marks on the face of the screen. Speakers should be padded where they tend to scratch the car when hung as intended.

more color



motion picture industry today. Their rapid and successful development has clearly illustrated that the public is

still interested in new ideas and showmanship in the presentation of motion picture entertainment.

FIGURE 17. Ten most mentioned complaints about drive-in theatre entertainment as learned from patron studies during the 1950 drive-in season.

at W 0-)

Cl

R V\' \

OLD EXIT LONG

PICTURES PROBLEMS INTERMISSIONS

w)

u

N

1:!

REFRESH- POOR MENT SALES

BAD GRADE

SPEAKERS AND SURFACING

N0 MUSIC AT BREAKS

SCREEN

R

to

V E:

PRICES T00 HIGH

POOR N0 WINDSHIELD SERVICE



THEATRE CATALOG "50-51
1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 154