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1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 16 (xvi)

1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition
1950-51 Theatre Catalog
1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 16
Page 16


1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 16

iiWhile the candy stand should be made to supplement, rather than

dominate the lobby, it can be made very attractive through the judicious

use of chrome, glass and lighting?



is but rarely that we encounter one which achieves the comfortable warmth of a well-appointed living room. Lobby furniture should be comfortable and inviting, rather than a collection of stiff museum like pieces. Murals and paintings often add considerably to appearance, but they must be selected with care and taste, so that they will not clash with the general pattern.

A fountain of running water cleverly illuminated is often striking, while goldfish pools and tanks of tropical fish, properly landscaped, are proven attention-getters. Growing plants is another method of adding life to an otherwise too-formal foyer.

Nearly every theatre now has a candy and refreshment standfwhich can generally be counted upon to provide about 20 per cent of the total revenue. While the candy stand should be made to supplement, rather than to dominate, the lobby, it can be made very attractive through the judicious use of chrome, glass, and lighting.

Carpet Adds New Life

Theatre carpet has to bear unusually heavy trafiic. When reasonably new, and when given frequent care through vacuuming and cleaning, it will maintain

its bright appearance, but even the best carpet is short-lived in comparison with some other items of theatre equipment.

There is nothing which will give your house a shoddy appearance more than a worn and dirty carpet. It is so conspicuously in view that all of your decorative schemes will lose much of their effect when contrasted with it. Tom carpet, of course, presents a hazard to patrons that should never be permitted in any theatre.

New carpet, if you need it, is one of the best investments you can make for stimulating patron interest. It cannot fail to attract attention and will give new life to your whole theatre. This is especially true because of modern patterns and designs, for an outmoded carpet is almost as had an eyesore as a worn carpet.

Carpeting, it is true, is expensive, and all-wool carpeting will become even more so because of the curtailment of imports from China and India. The solution might lie in a blend of wool with synthetic materials. These synthetic fibers take dyes readily, and have good wearing qualities. While their price at present is not much lower than all-wool carpeting, it is possible that their cost will be considerably reduced through increased production and improved methods of manufacture.

Seats Must Be Comfortable

You cannot hope to operate a theatre successfully if you have old-fashioned, hard, uncomfortable seating. Make no mistake about thisf If your boxoflice is showing a steady decline, make an honest comparison of your seating with that of your competitors, and if your theatre

' CANDY STAND AND CARPET ALIKE ADD TO CHARM OF LOBBY IN ARGO. ELMONT, N. Y.



XVI





"There is nothing that will give your house a shoddy appearance more

than a worn and dirty carpet. It is so conspicuously in view that all of

your decorative schemes will lose much of their efect when contrasted to it?



chairs are distinctly inferior, replace them just as quickly as you can.

People attend motion picture theatres! not only for entertainment, but for rest and relaxation. Once seated, they desire to concentrate their entire attention upon the picture on the screen. It is simply impossible to enjoy even the best picture if you are uncomfortable for a matter of hours, and you cannot expect people to lay out money in return for discomfort.

Limitation of the size of your theatre, and consequently of your budget, is no excuse for not having comfortable seating. If you cannot afford de luxe chairs, there are a wide variety of modern comfortable chairs to be had in almost every price bracket. If the metal body of your seating and the padding are still good, you can achieve the appearance of new seating with nothing more than a recovering job.

There are certain points to bear in mind, if you sincerely have the comfort of your patrons at heart. You are obviously interested in having as many seats as possible in your theatre, but don't strive for the narrow seating of a football stadium. It is more profitable to have slightly fewer comfortable chairs which will be filled at every performance than a larger number of narrow uncomfortable ones which will always be half empty.

If you can possibly afford to do so, buy the wider types of chairs with thick padded backs and deep cushions. The life of the chairs may be extended through the use of covers, but they must be of a type that can be readily slipped off for recleaning or replacement.

Heating and Ventilation

Good heating, air conditioning, and ventilation systems are requirements for every theatre. The theatre is a public

gathering place where people are con*

fined for hours, and they must find it pleasant and comfortable.

Air conditioning is expected of every theatre. There are many people who go into a movie on hot summer days not because they want to see the picture, but simply to get cool. On the other hand, you can do too good a job with your cooling. Keep a close watch on the weather outside, and regulate your temperatures so that the contrast is not too sudden or too pronounced.

We have not heard of anyone going to a theatre simply to get warm, but there are many who stay away because the heating is insufiiciont in winter, and they do not wish to shiver through a double feature or run the risk of taking cold. If you are consistently having trouble with your heating plant, donlt just shrug your shoulders and look sympathetic when your patrons complain.

THEATRE CATALOG 1950-51

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1950-51 Theatre Catalog, 9th Edition, Page 16