Drive-Ins.com
> > > >

1952 Theatre Catalog, 10th Edition, Page 402 (364)

1952 Theatre Catalog, 10th Edition
1952 Theatre Catalog
1952 Theatre Catalog, 10th Edition, Page 402
Page 402


1952 Theatre Catalog, 10th Edition, Page 402

Paramountis "Inter-Film" Theatre TV System

It Makes Use of the Standard 35mm. Projector And Permits Permanent Film Record of Program

Fortunately, the movie exhibitor is not alone in his campaign to develop and improve methods of making large screen theatre television a practical enterprise. Several of the major pros duction companies have made great strides toward this end, and one of the pioneers in the field is Paramount Pictures Corporation. A leading manufacturer of theatre television equipment, Paramount has presented programs in New York for over four years. Its largescreen TV system, which makes use of the standard 35mm. booth projection equipment, is now installed in seven theatres. Paramountls ttlnter-Filmii theatre television system operates on the film intermediate technique, where the television image is photographed from a special high-definition monitor on standard 35mm. film, processed, fed directly into the standard theatre projector, and projected on the standard theatre screen. The equipment includes three basic units.

Monitor Unit

The first unit is a high-definition television monitor capable of displaying a negative or positive picture on the face of the cathode ray tube, and with an electronic shutter as an integral part of this equipment to allow the 30-frame



BRIEF: Paramountis tilnter-Filmii theatre television system operates on the film intermediate technique, in which the television image is photographed from a special high-definition monitor . . . on standard 35mm. film . . . is processed and fed directly into the standard theatre projector . . and is projected on the standard theatre screen.

Requiring but 60 square feet of floor space . . . the Paramount unit is easily installed. It uses 220-volt and 110-volt power . . . which is usually available in the booth . . . and hot and cold water outlets are needed. Operating costs are estimated at $140 per hour.

The Paramount system gives the theotre operator complete control over programmingr . . . and provides him with a permanent film record of his show . . . which he might be able to again repeat or rent out after he has used it. The system also allows drive-ins to make use of large screen TV. The unit can be easily adapth to color projection.

h

television signal to synchronize with the 24-frnme motion picture rate. This monitor is designed to operate on standard SZS-line, 60-Helds-per-second television transmission. Tho circuits are designed for a band width of 10 megacycics. However, it can be converted to moot higher definition. The electronic shutter,

which blanks out the cathode ray tube at the proper time to allow pull-down of film in the shutterless camera, is completely automatic and assumes proper exposure of one television frame for each motion picture frame. The polarity of the picture on the face of the cathode ray tube is controlled by one switch, thus allowing either a direct positive, as would be the case in a direct theatre telecast, or a negative, as would be used in kinescoping, or any purpose where prints are desired, Simple controls adjust for non-linearity of incoming signals and for picture brightness and contrast.

Recording Unit

The second unit consists of the actual recording equipment. This includes a 12,000 foot film magazine, a special single-system shutterless camera, and a newly designed sound-on-film recorder with no moving parts. The 12,000-foot magazine allows for continuous operation for periods well in excess of two

FIGURE leMonitor is shown in right hand column. Figure Z-Recording equipment shown below.

gee



hours. The recorded sound track is a variable density type, and sound fidelity is limited only by the theatre sound system. This unit continuously photographs the image on the cathode ray tube and simultaneously records the sound so that a completely exposed

in 3} 0M mo sum



THEATRE CATALOG i952
1952 Theatre Catalog, 10th Edition, Page 402