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1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 259 (223)

1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition
1954-55 Theatre Catalog
1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 259
Page 259


1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 259

RESLLTIW PICTURE (I/O WING) FROM RECTANULAR APERTURE

PROJECTOR 0N SCREEN CENTER FLAT SCREEN

PROJECTOR T0 LEFT OF SCREEN CENTER FLAT SCREEN

WROECTOR T0 LEFT 0F SCREEN CENTER CURVE!) SCREEN

AFERTURE SHAPE: ro OITAIN RECTANGULAR PICTURE

PROJECTOR ON SCREEN CENTER FLAT SCREEN

PROJECTOR TO LEFT 0F SCREEN CENTER FLAT SCREEN

PROJECTOR T0 LEFT OF SCREEN CENTER CURVED SCREEN

HIGN AmLED PROJECTIW

W7 E: HORIZONTAL CURVATWE IILL SONETlNES BE OTNER TNAN DEFICTED OEFENDING UPON SCREEN CURVATURE AND FROJECTION ANGLE.

by the purchase of new equipment. The precise methods available will depend upon the policy of the manufacturer or supplier and the desire of the exhibitor.

Sprocket-driven footage counters must have the sprocket tooth width and Spacing modified. With most devices of this kind it is sufficient to machine off the inside surfaces of the teeth. If the dimension at the outsides of the sprocket teeth does not exceed 1.167 inches and the dimension between the inside faces of the sprocket teeth is not less than 1.087 inches, a satisfactory sprocket will be obtained. The exhibitor may elect to obtain modification parts or new sprockets from the equipment manufacturer or any other source available to him. It is desirable, but not mandatory, that aluminum reels be used, particularly when using 2,000 foot spools. Aluminum reels, particularly the cast versions, generally maintain their shape and there is no possibility of introducing noise into the magnetic sound tracks because of incipient magnetization of the reel. It is strongly recommended that badly misshaped reels not be used since they can easily cause uneven winding which

1954-55 THEATRE CATALOG

DlSTORTED SHAPES ARE EXAGGERATED FOR EASE OF ILLUSTRATION.



aggravates the possibility of edge damage. Wear of the magnetic reproducer heads is accelerated by dirty film. The exhibitor can help materially by keeping his equipment in such condition that the prints will remain clean while in his possession. Further, it is sensible practice to handle the film in a clean place, not let the film lie or rub on tables or fioors where dirt is readily picked up.

CinemaScope Attachment

The CinemaScope optics have been designed as frontal attachments to the regular projection lenses, and represent an approximate six and one-half inches of extension beyond such projection lenses of a diameter of 2-25/32 inches, and an approximate nine and one-half inches in installations using projection lenses of a diameter of four inches. At the present time, projection lenses of focal lengths of 5.00 inches or less are furnished in barrel diameters of 2-25/32 inches, and projection lenses in focal lengths of 5.25 inches and over are furnished in barrel diameters of 4.00 inches, though in older types these longer focal length lenses appear in the smaller diameter barrels.

FIGURE 4 offers exaggerated drawing. of lypicd apomuo plalal after they have been proparly shaped for a curved projection moon.

It is recommended, however, that this latter type be replaced by new, higher quality, high-speed lenses. Some present projection lenses may not be of sufficiently high quality to permit the undistorted projection of the CinemaScope picture and replacement of such projection lenses is desirable, and may be essential. Should the theatre desire a change in picture height additional projection lenses may be required, and these should be of high quality and have a flat field. In the larger sizes, the CinemaScope attachment is supported by brackets. The adjustments for the CinemaScope optical unit are as follows:

Adjusting for Projection Distance

Hold the attachment in the left hand with the front of the unit towards the right. Unlock the adjustment by loosening the red colored ring. Rotate the large diameter knurled uncolored ring so that the top turns away and continue the rotation until the end is reached but do not go against the end with much force. Turn the whole unit until you locate a short red line, parallel to the axis and on the same part of the assembly as the uncolored ring. Hold the uncolored knurled ring from turning and rotate the left end of the assembly so that the top moves away until the short red index line is opposite the red line on the rotating part which has the number 50. Note that another red line crossing the line marked 50 at a right angle, and making a plus (+) Sign, is just visible, and that there are no other crossed lines to be seen. If the attackment we're left in this adjustment it would be propeiily set for a project-ion throw of fifty feet; the numerals indicate the distance from the projector to the screen center. The setting and the unfolded scale for both models are illustrated in Figures 5 and 6. Continue the rotation past the intervening numbered lines until the next set of crossed lines appears at the number 60, which will be the next number higher than 50. When the short index line and the numbered line are directly opposite, the lens is adjusted for a 60 foot throw. Should a projection distance somewhere between 50 and 60 feet exist then estimate the correct setting between the two marks, as for example, if the throw were 53 feet the index line should be set about 3/10 of the distance from 50 to 60.

For throws greater than 60 feet, continue the rotation as before, watching for a crossed line to appear at that number which is just smaller than the projection distance and the next set of crossed lines would be greater than the required setting. Reset to the smaller number, that is, the one closest to but less than the throw. Estimate the setting between the two closest numbers, one lower and the other higher, as previously described and lock the adjustment by tightening the red colored ring,

The picture must be carefully leveled by projector adjustment before the attachment is applied. The attachment must never be used as a means to correct picture tilt. The CinemaScope at
1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 259