Drive-Ins.com
> > > >

1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 76 (42)

1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition
1954-55 Theatre Catalog
1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 76
Page 76


1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 76

safer and better. Surely there must be something basically wrong with that person even if he does not know the full import of what he is doing, or is cold blooded enough not to care what happens to himself or to others around him. It is up to theatre owners as a group to educate that type of person and make him realize that he is jeopardizing the safety of his associates, as well as his own.

Good Housekeeping

Surely the one basic and greatest safety factor is good housekeeping. All of us realize that and it is, by far, more important than anything else you can do. Yet we all agree that there is a good deal of human carelessness involved, and no matter how rigid the supervision might be, there is always that one slight chance that a careless match or cigarette can do damage beyond repair.

Surely every theatre owner should see that he has the best type of construction possible in his particular building. Fire detection devices are extremely helpful. Alarm transmission is highly recommended and by all means good sprinkler equipment can prove to be a great safety factor.

The most recent estimates of fire losses in theatres prepared by the National Fire Protective ASsoeiation, which is an international organization, are those for the year 1952. This tabulation includes the, number and loss in tires in various occupancies, but important to our people is the fact that in that year there were 2000 fires in theatres, resulting in a loss of over six million dollars.

Theatre Fires

There are hundreds of fires happein ing in theatres all of the time, but just

in the last few years we have had some disastrous ones.

On September 26, 1948, Picayune, Mississippi a $50,000 fire, a two-story brick and wood theatre was totally destroyed when fire occurred at 12 midnight in the second floor projection room. On the arrival of the Fire Department the building was totally involved. The theatre had been closed for several hours previous to the outbreak of the fire.

On August 23, 1948 at Glendale, California, the failure of an asbestos curtain to Work efficiently allowed the fire to spread to the auditorium from back stage. A man was preparing to Hameproof the stage drop and had been testing other drops previously fiame-proof with a match. It is possible that during this testing the untreated curtain may have ignited. The workmen failed to use the stand-pipe that was provided back stage. This one story lire resisting building was badly damaged to the tune of $125,000.

On July 15, 1948, the operator of a motion picture projection booth was critically burned when a reel of film that he was changing suddenly flared up. All patrons escaped without mishap and the fire was confined to the booth. A mere $5,000.

On June 20, 1948, at Los Angeles, a $75,000 fire destroyed approximately one third of a two-story concrete theatre. The fire originated on the first floor at the stage and spread to the roof, causing a damage of $75,000.

On May 9, 1947 at Craig, Colorado, complete destruction of a one-story cement block and frame theatre building, and serious damage to two other buildings. Although the cause was not definitely determined, it was believed to be started by careleSS smoking. A 25mile wind spread the fire to the other buildings. An $84,000 damage.

DRAMATIC TEST shows one-half of stairway (upper left) treated with Pyr-Kote and lire started. After 7 minutes (upper right) flames engulf untreated portion which collapses after 12 minutes (lower left). Fyr-Kote treated section still retards fire after 26 minutes (lower right). This lest offers visual proof of the ability of this type of paint to be barrier against spread of fire.

At Presque Isle, Maine a $150,000 damage to a motion picture theatre building, Again it was the strong wind that spread the blaze and embers over a block area.

At Brazil, Indiana :1 $205,000 damage on February 23, 1947. Believed to have been caused by boys smoking in the balcony during the last show. Fire was discovered at 5:30 am. the next morning, breaking through the balcony into the apartment below. The building was of two-story brick joisted construction with open stair-ways. The building was totally destroyed and several others damaged.

On February 7, 1947 at Texarkana, Arkansas, a $75,000 fire starting at the first floor in the rear totally destroyed a two-story brick building.

At Cairo, Illinois on February 6, 1947, a $130,000 fire believed to have been caused by a defective furnace flue. The fire gained such headway before the Fire Department arrived that they were hard pressed to prevent the spread to other neighboring buildings.

If you are the type of theatre owner that thinks "It canlt happen here" you will be amazed at how almost every day more and more fires are happening in theatres, even with modern fire fighting apparatus and fire prevention. Something must be done to stop the tragic loss of life and property. The proper application of fire retardant paint such as this Fyr-Kote material can definitely help prevent the rapid spread of flame, which after all is the main thing that gives people time to get out of a building and the Fire Department to get in and control it.

Common Fire Causes

Check your own theatre against these common fire causes in motion picture theatres. Here they are as issued by the NFPA.

FIRE RECORDe

MOTION PICTURE THEATRES

Projection Booth Fires . . . . . . .. 37.0%

Smoking and matches . . . . . . . . . . 21.0

Misuse of electricity . . . . . . . . . . . 10.0

Heating defects . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 8.0

Incendiary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5

Spontaneous ignition . . . . . . . . .. 4.5

Exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5

Defective chimney or fiue . . . , .. 1.5 Multiple occupancy fire hazards. . 1.5 Hot ashes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1.5 prlosion (unknown causes) 1.0 Children with matches . . . . . . . .. 1.0 Boiler explosion . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1.0

Cloth or scenery touching



bulb on stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100.0%

FIRE RETARDANT PAINT

However, in the last few years a new method of fire prevention has come forth which might well prove to be the greatest advancement yet made, for thea THEATRE CATAL'o'o 1954-55
1954-55 Theatre Catalog, 12th Edition, Page 76